JUSP: JISC’s Journal Usage Statistics Portal

Ross MacIntyre
The University of Manchester

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The JISC Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) has been built in response to demand from UK higher education libraries who simply wish to obtain (COUNTER-compliant) journal usage reports ‘without tears’. Whilst primarily a service for institutional libraries, JUSP offers benefits to all involved. It ensures libraries have accurate and comparable figures to assess the value of their subscriptions; makes the delivery and analysis of usage statistics more efficient and comprehensive; its SUSHI server enables libraries (or agent) to download usage statistics directly from JUSP and reduces administration overheads. This presentation will outline how the team is working with publishers (>20 NESLi2) to deliver usage statistics to libraries (>140). It illustrates the importance and value of collaboration and consultation.

ROSS MacINTYRE currently works within Mimas, the UK National Data Centre at the University of Manchester. Ross is the Service Manager for the ‘Web of Knowledge Service for UK Education’, ‘UK PubMed Central’, ‘Zetoc’ and ‘JUSP’ (JISC’s Journal Usage Statistics Portal). He is also responsible for Digital Library-related R&D services and had formal involvement with Dublin Core and OpenURL standards development. He was heavily involved in the development of NESLI (National Electronic Site Licence Initiative), the JSTOR mirror service and the implementation of ‘Shibboleth’ for Mimas’ range of services. Recent projects for JISC include PIRUS2 (extending COUNTER to Article-level) and MimasLD (creating linked data from Mimas services). Ross has been an elected member of the UKSG Committee since April 2000, the Education Officer (2003-6) and regularly talks at their seminars. He is a member of the JISC Collections Stakeholder Group and the Technical Advisory Boards of COUNTER and the UK Access Management Federation.

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